The History Of Photography

4th to 5th Centuries B.C 
Photography was first introduced in the early Centuries by Greek and Chinese philosophers who explained the scientific studies behind sight and the behaviour of light and the relation to camera lenses.

1727
An Inorganic compound ‘silver nitrate was discovered to darken upon exposure to light by Johann Heinrich Schulze.
Johann-Heinrich-Schulze

1794
First Panorama opens

1814
The first photographic image with camera obscura was achieved by Joseph Niepce. However the imaged required eight hours of light exposure before fading.

1837
The invention of an Image that was fixed and did not fade, it required less than 30 minutes of light exposure.

1840
The first patent was issued to American Alexander Wolcott for his camera.

1884
The first flexible film was invented by George Eastman
GeorgeEastman2

1888
Kodak roll films were invented.

1914
35mm still cameras were developed


1927
The flash bulb was invented

1948
Polaroid cameras were placed on the market

1960
Underwater cameras were invented for the US army

1963
Colour was introduced to instant colour film
1977_OneStep_illustration

1968
Photograph of earth from the moon
136063main_bm4_high
1978
The first autofocus camera

1980
The camcorder is introduced by Sony

1984
The first digital electronic still camera introduced by Canon
Canon_PowerShot_600_CP+_2011

1985 
Pixar introduces digital imaging processing

1990 
Eastman introduces image storage with the CD

1994
Digital Cameras become available on the market for consumers by Apple and Kodak

2000
The first camera phone
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